Avengers: The End Of An Era

Survival+rate+7%25+%0AAfter+11+years+of+play-ing+Tony+Stark%2C+Robert+Downey+Jr.+is+due+to+retire+from+the+series.+As+the+flagship+charac-ter+of+the+MCU%2C+Tony%E2%80%99s+death+would+wrap+up+this+chapter+of+Marvel+movies+in+a+nice+bow.+With+Tony%E2%80%99s+self+sacri-ficing+tendencies%2C+he%E2%80%99s+not+likely+to+survive.
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Avengers: The End Of An Era

Survival rate 7% 
After 11 years of play-ing Tony Stark, Robert Downey Jr. is due to retire from the series. As the flagship charac-ter of the MCU, Tony’s death would wrap up this chapter of Marvel movies in a nice bow. With Tony’s self sacri-ficing tendencies, he’s not likely to survive.

Survival rate 7% After 11 years of play-ing Tony Stark, Robert Downey Jr. is due to retire from the series. As the flagship charac-ter of the MCU, Tony’s death would wrap up this chapter of Marvel movies in a nice bow. With Tony’s self sacri-ficing tendencies, he’s not likely to survive.

Survival rate 7% After 11 years of play-ing Tony Stark, Robert Downey Jr. is due to retire from the series. As the flagship charac-ter of the MCU, Tony’s death would wrap up this chapter of Marvel movies in a nice bow. With Tony’s self sacri-ficing tendencies, he’s not likely to survive.

Survival rate 7% After 11 years of play-ing Tony Stark, Robert Downey Jr. is due to retire from the series. As the flagship charac-ter of the MCU, Tony’s death would wrap up this chapter of Marvel movies in a nice bow. With Tony’s self sacri-ficing tendencies, he’s not likely to survive.


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In May of 2008, Marvel introduced the world to Tony Stark. In four words, he set the foundation for the next age of superhero mov-ies: “I am Iron Man.” As the release of “Avengers: Endgame” looms just over the horizon, it’s time to look back over the last 11 years and acknowledge what Marvel has done well in order to dominate the market in action movies.

Spoiler alert: it’s not Baby Groot. Well, okay. Maybe it’s a little bit Baby Groot.

Marvel has created characters that are relatable and lovable. Amidst all the superpow-ers and the sci-fi tech are characters that feel real, and that appeals to viewers more than any fight scene ever could. In recent movies, this relatability has become more apparent. With a predominantly black cast and ex-ecutive team, “Black Panther” is a wonderful example of the diversity Marvel has worked recently to improve.

“Black Panther” also included a variety of strong female characters, from warriors to lead-ers to scientists. While the world could certainly do with a few more female led movies (thank you “Captain Marvel”), Marvel has a history of writing intelligent, capable women.

Pepper Potts is CEO of Stark Industries. Dr. Jane Foster is a brilliant scientist whose work was so advanced SHIELD confiscated it. Natasha Romanoff is arguably the deadli-est assassin in the world. Wanda Maximoff is an exceptionally powerful immigrant who over-came terrible loss to help save the world. Carol Danvers is the most powerful being in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Marvel isn’t afraid of writing strong women. Possibly the best way Marvel has helped people to identify with their characters is giving them problems that are relatable, even in the context of magic and spaceships and superpow-ers. The easiest example of this is Peter Parker and his high school tribulations, but this trope is visible throughout the movies. Marvel has done a good job writing characters dealing with vari-ous issues.

“Iron Man 3” shows Tony having realistic anxiety attacks triggered by his PTSD. Bucky Barnes is an amputee war veteran. Rhodey in-jures his spine and uses aids to walk. Thor doesn’t get along with his family. Who doesn’t argue with their siblings? Scott Lang is dealing with a divorce and fighting for joint custody of his daughter. Of all Americans over the age of 18, 15 percent have been di-vorced.

These are issues that are often shied away from in media and pop culture. By placing these problems in their movies, Marvel opens itself up to a broad audience.

Even if you can’t relate to the characters’ issues, Marvel fills its movies with people who are funny, kind, and easily lovable. Tony Stark and Stephen Strange’s sarcas-tic, witty remarks leave the audience laughing, while Peter Parker and Baby Groot’s innocent personas warm viewers’ hearts. Fans continue to fall in love with the kindness and chivalry of Thor and Steve Rog-ers, and the casual confidence of Peggy Carter and Hope Van Dyke make them easy to adore.

The Marvel Cinematic Universe has been able to corner the market in superhero movies by creating characters that are close to viewers’ hearts. Time and time again fans come back to the theatres, buy the DVDs and memorabilia, and tell everyone they know about Marvel be-cause they’re invested in the characters. Marvel movies are still influential after 11 years because they’ve made us all fall in love with their heroes. Hopefully we’ll still have some left after “Endgame.”

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Avengers: The End Of An Era